Why Brew Beer?

Yes, this will become tasty beer.

Yes, this will become tasty beer.

Editor’s Note: I’d like to introduce our newest contributor, Henry Hunt. Henry’s a homebrewer, Mac geek, and all around great guy. He’s someone I’ve known for years, and he asked me a while back if he could submit some articles on homebrewing, so here he is. Take it away, Henry.

Simple.  If you like to drink beer, you should make it.  If you have friends and family that like to drink beer, you may have, dare I say, a community obligation to brew beer.

The first step in my homebrew process is to open and pour a tasty beer.  Preferably in the taste profile neighborhood of what I intend to brew.  Step two is to take a big enjoyable swallow.  It is like a coach’s pep talk before the game or the minister’s sermon before you go out in the world to do good deeds.  Now inspired, it is time to brew.

So if you don’t like to drink beer and are not willing to share with your friends and neighbors, you should stop reading this and take your cat, Fluffy, for a walk.

Sometimes people argue that others are better at making good beer.  Or it is better to support the local economy by purchasing your beer.  Or still others say it is too much time and trouble.  All stupid points; and totally invalid arguments.

Of course there are people who make better beer then you.  There are people who do everything better then you.  You are not that special no matter what your mother told you.

Supporting the local beer economy is a valid and noble cause just for its own sake.  These local purveyors of malted goodness are not simply spots on the map to enjoy friends and quench your thirst.  They are now centers of research, learning and innovation for the master beer maker that you are becoming.

So when venturing out in to the cold, icy night, tell your lovely wife, “I am on an important research mission to a great center of libation learning.  And this, my dear, is the sacrifice I must make so that I can continue to create more of that tasty, foamy goodness that keeps you so happy my angel.”  She will gaze back at you with respect; and love you for the scientist and humanitarian that you are now becoming.

As for the time and trouble.  Please remember that you are drinking during the entire process.  And you are doing this for the good of the community.  And if you still think it is too much time, you are not drinking enough.

Vista Ale.  American Pale Ale with smooth finish.

Vista Ale. American Pale Ale with smooth finish.

And finally you wonder.  What will my beer taste like?  Will people make good or bad faces when they drink it?  How good does my beer have to be?

The answer is simple.  Your homebrew needs to be “Good enough to drink”.

Brewing is a pretty simple process.  Of the hundreds of batches I have brewed over the years only a couple were not good enough to drink.  Most were really tasty brews that have brought smiles to my friends and kept the wife happy.

Smiling friends, a happy wife and all because of my beer.  Good reasons to homebrew.  But the biggest reason is because I enjoy drinking beer.  So it is research tonight and brew tomorrow.  My work is never done.

We will be sharing our journey through the homebrewing world in this blog.  With tips from experts, friends and personal experience, we hope you gain some useful information to enjoy your brewing and beer drinking more.

  1. I must say this has me thinking that I really need to start brewing my own. I’m not sure I would ever get past the initial research phase, but since this is all in the cause of science I suppose I would still be doing my part for humanity. And that makes me feel so good about myself that I might have to go open another one . . .

    Reply
  2. Henry,
    If your home brewed beer is so good why do we have to drink that old store bought stuff at UL Tailgating?

    Do keep on cooking those great meals!!!

    Reply
  3. Allison Davis Ruggiero January 17, 2013, 12:23 am

    Love it Henry keep up the good work!

    Reply
  4. You have a new fan from Darkest Afrika.

    Reply

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